Race, Class, and Katrina

Date:  Sunday, January 22, 2006
Speaker:  Professor Theresa Martinez, University of Utah

Theresa Martinez is currently Associate Professor of Sociology and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies for Outreach at the University of Utah. Her teaching and research deal with issues of racial and ethnic relations, deviant behavior, race, class and gender, juvenile delinquency, and popular culture. Professor Martinez has provided diversity training for the Utah State Bar, the Salt Lake Police Department, the Utah Annual Judicial Conference, the Salt Lake County Drug Court, and the Salt Lake Legal Defenders. Currently, Professor Martinez is the Diversity Trainer for Juvenile Probation within the Administrative Office of the Courts. Professor Martinez has appeared in Time magazine, the Miami Herald, and the New York Times, as well as on National Public Radio and 20/20: News Magazine.

“Hurricane Katrina illuminated race and class divisions that still exist within American society. This presentation will underscore these divisions both historically and through a discussion of current headline news stories all through the lens of social science thinking today. It is hoped that listeners will gain some insight into current race and class issues that still plague our society, and begin to think through ways to heal these rifts.”

Suggested references and resources:
Jason De Parle, “What Happens to a Race Deferred.” New York Times Article – September 4, 2005.
Films – Mississippi Burning • Rosewood • Ghosts of Mississippi • Zoot Suit • Smoke Signals • Cesar Chavez: The Fight in the Fields • Stand and Deliver

Advertisement

Civil Liberties in the Post 9/11 Era: The Question of Torture

Date:  Sunday, January 8, 2006
Speaker:  Dani Eyer, Executive Director, American Civil Liberties Union of Utah

The ACLU, founded in 1920, is a nationwide, nonpartisan organization dedicated to working in the courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by both the Constitution and the laws of the United States.

Dani Eyer has a BA in political science and a law degree earned from BYU. She has been a high school social studies teacher, and ran an independent bookstore called Atticus Books. In the 80’s Eyer was an associate trial lawyer with a mid-size firm specializing in plaintiff’s litigation. She appeared before the Utah Supreme Court and the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. Eyer had been doing volunteer legal research work for the ACLU for a year before becoming executive director. Local ACLU issues she has worked on include free speech on the Main Street Plaza, student rights in the high schools, legislative issues such as same-sex unions and women’s reproductive rights, negotiations over safe Utah jails and prisons, and much work related to the erosions of freedom for everyone since 9/11.

“What are the erosions of civil liberties we have experienced since 9/11? Must or should we sacrifice civil liberties to achieve safety and security? Has the security of Americans in fact increased at home and around the world? Is torture necessary or moral toward the advancement of freedom and/or security?”

For introductory or further information please see the national ACLU web site: aclu.org
Go to the Safe and Free section, for materials on: Patriot Act, torture, surveillance, suppression of dissent, detainees, and discrimination, etc.

Civil Liberties in the Post 9/11 Era: The Question of Torture

Date:  Sunday, January 8, 2006
Speaker:  Dani Eyer, Executive Director, American Civil Liberties Union of Utah

The ACLU, founded in 1920, is a nationwide, nonpartisan organization dedicated to working in the courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties guaranteed by both the Constitution and the laws of the United States.

 Dani Eyer has a BA in political science and a law degree earned from BYU. She has been a high school social studies teacher, and ran an independent bookstore called Atticus Books. In the 80’s Eyer was an associate trial lawyer with a mid-size firm specializing in plaintiff’s litigation. She appeared before the Utah Supreme Court and the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. Eyer had been doing volunteer legal research work for the ACLU for a year before becoming executive director. Local ACLU issues she has worked on include free speech on the Main Street Plaza, student rights in the high schools, legislative issues such as same-sex unions and women’s reproductive rights, negotiations over safe Utah jails and prisons, and much work related to the erosions of freedom for everyone since 9/11.

“What are the erosions of civil liberties we have experienced since 9/11? Must or should we sacrifice civil liberties to achieve safety and security? Has the security of Americans in fact increased at home and around the world? Is torture necessary or moral toward the advancement of freedom and/or security?”

Suggested References and Resources:
For introductory or further information please see the national ACLU web site: aclu.org – Go to the Safe and Free section, for materials on: Patriot Act, torture, surveillance, suppression of dissent, detainees, and discrimination, etc.