The Financial Crisis and the Great Recession: How’s the Recovery?

Free and Open to the Public

Date:  Sunday, December 13, 2013
Speaker:  William T. Carlisle, Ph.D.
Time:  Meet & Greet: 1:45 pm •  Presentation: 2:00 pm   • Meeting Closes: 3:30 pm
Salt Lake Main Library, 210 East 400 South – Fourth Floor Meeting Room

Dr. Carlisle is emeritus faculty in the Department of Economics, University of Utah, where he taught for 35 years. He has taught courses in economic theory, American Economic History, and Current Economic Problems. One of his favorite fields of interest is the Great Depression of the 1930’s, and the one from 2008 to 2011.

“We’ll discuss the origins of the Great Recession and various processes the economy went through to avoid a greater calamity and promote recovery in the economy and the labor market. We’ll talk about policies as well. We’ll think about the recovery as being on-going and still incomplete.”

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Reduction of Area Source Emissions through Improved Energy Efficiency in Buildings

Date:  Sunday, November 22, 2015
Speaker:  Ashley Miller, J.D

Meet & Greet: 1:45 pm – Presentation: 2:00 pm – Meeting Closes: 3:30 pm
Salt Lake Main Library, 210 East 400 South
Fourth Floor Meeting Room

Ashley Miller is an attorney originally from Lake Tahoe, California. She is the program manager for Breathe Utah, with an interest and focus in the correlation between improved energy efficiency in buildings and improved air quality on the Wasatch Front.

“Salt Lake City suffers from some of the worst air quality in the nation. Though most people in Utah understand that vehicle emissions are the largest contributor to air pollution, most Utahns misapprehend how large a role our homes and businesses play in our pollution problem. Most believe that point source emissions like refineries and mines are the second largest contributor, although according to the Department of Environmental Quality, our homes and small businesses account for 39% of our air pollution, while point sources contribute 11-13%.

Our attention must turn to the second largest contributor to our poor air quality. This is particularly important given the projections that the population along the Wasatch Front will double in the next thirty years, while our vehicle fleet will gradually be replaced with cleaner cars burning lower sulfur fuel.”

References and Resources
Envision Utah, http://envisionutah.org
Utah Division of Air Quality, www.airquality,utah.gov
Utah Department of Environmental Quality, www.deq.utah.gov
Salt Lake City’s Project Skyline, www.slcgov.com/projectskyline
The City Energy Project, www.cityenergyproject.org
Institute for Market Transformation, www.imt.org
UCAIR, www.ucair.org